Sustainability

The Swiss Alps 100 is a "GREEN COMMITMENT" event.

Our event is taking us to spectacular, natural, remote, and fragile landscapes. This is a privilege and we are fully supporting to preserve these landscapes as best as possible. Climate change is placing us, our planet, and future generations at risk. We need to reduce the impact of our activity on the climate and to display climate leadership by engaging actively and collectively in striving to achieve climate neutrality. For these reasons, the Swiss Alps 100 is committed to achieve the goals of Leave no Trace, being Carbon Neutral, and Zero Waste.



1 . Towards No Plastic Usage

We teamed up with pacovis.ch who are supplying us all the single-use items like cups, plates, bowls, wine glasses, forks, knives, and forks to our aid stations and at the finish line. All these products are made from raw plant materials that can be quickly regrown, are 100% biodegradable and climate friendly. Our costs are significantly higher with these products compared to the plastic alternatives but it is the right thing to do.


2 . Towards Using Less Resources

We are working with almightytree.ch in order to give participants the option to not get a race t-shirt but donate the costs of that shirt towards planting a tree in Switzerland. For every 6 donated t-shirts Almighty Tree is planting a new tree in Switzerland.


3 . Towards Zero Waste

To mark the Swiss Alps 100 courses we are using approximately 2500 flags and 1500 ribbons. In order to dramatically reduce waste we pay more for flags, which have a bamboo stick instead of a plastic stick. Bamboo sticks are stronger and we reuse about 95% of the marking flags. The ribbons are made of fabric and not plastic and they have stainless steel clips which not only makes it easy to mark the course and remove them. More importantly, they do not break or rust and can be used year after year.


4 . Towards Carbon Neutrality

Every race needs aid stations and at the Swiss Alps 100 we have 12 of them. Many races are using portable inverter generators to produce electricity which emits various air pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, xylene, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and others.

At the Swiss Alps 100 we strategically placed our aid stations so 11 out of 12 of them are using a clean energy plug-in instead of a generator. The Breithorn aid station is the most remote one and there is simply no available electricity. But even there we use natural gas to cook and heat the aid station and the generator is only used to power the communication devices.

We will continuously change the way we work to contribute more to fight climate change. As we make changes we will announce it on this page.

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